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Topic: Author:  
Male
Fr. Australia
Topic: YES! i do mind you pushing in when there is a queue!
ok, heres the situation... i'm at the supermarket buying some vegies. waited behind an elderly couple to get the vegies weighed and priced (as you know, you have to get it weighed and priced before you can checkout... only found that out alittle while ago). as i was waiting, a man cuts in front of the elderly couple places his stuff on the scale; gets it weighed and his off... i kind of let that one slide but then he comes back with something else. this time he practically cut in while the supermarket lady was in the middle of attending to the elderly couple items! OMG! that made my blood boil!

does anyone else found this disgusting in terms of common courtesy for others?? or is it that i've been spoiled by others common courtesy while growing up in Melbourne; that a little incident like this would enrage me to point of maybe teaching that fella some manners with my fist...
27 Mar 2011
Male
Fr. United States
Ha! I totally agree. I am from America and this kind of stuff just makes me angry. Like his stuff is more important than anyone else's? Wait your damn turn! I dont usually let them get away with this anymore. Give them an elbow or something. Its just like the pushing and shoving to get on the bus first. Drives me nuts!
We will never get used to the rudeness!
27 Mar 2011


Female
Fr. China
Usually I'd say something when someone cut in.Most people would just walk back in line.Sometimes the clerk wouldnt even accept the "cut in line" people's money or something.But still,it happens a lot that some people don't want to go back in line even when they realise that there are people complaining about them.A fist may solve the problem but I'm not sure if it's a good way.When it comes to a situation that a lot of people cut in line,like BRT,what do we do then?I'd just say welcome to China.
27 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. United States
welcome to china.... quit *****ing....
27 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. Australia
this ain't *****ing dude... i'm just voicing anger for the elderly couple who literately seemed ok with that situation! what if they were your elderly grandparents... enough said.
27 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. United States
中国制造 ....the elderly couple have obviously learned to accept the situation. The longer you stay here the more you realize some things will never truly change. Just "accept" it, and things will "seem" easier to "live with".
27 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. Spain
Well, courtesy is different depending where you are.
I found an old-fashion Spaniard who comes here for two weeks and he started complaining because chinese never follow "Ladies First" rule. But probably, if he knew the origin of the rule, he never will follow it as well.

Anyway, if you were just cutting and prizing your veggies probably it was not a proper queue like buying tickets or waiting a taxi in the train station. I mean... you see they're busy and you just stay behind because you consider that's the right thing.

Your blood is boiling because you consider they're being not polite. If that happens in your home country probably you will quarrel.

-

I remember when I was in Spain, I was making queue in a Supermarket. There was a long queue. 5 persons with carts, at nite, on weekend, all of them buy a lot of stuff.
So a worker comes to open the cashier beside and ask us to come.

In small supermarkets, they have only 2 or 3 cashiers the queues are longer, so they used to say " Please come in order" (so the one who is waiting for a long time, can go ahead)

But in the big ones, like Trust Mart, they say "Cashier is open, please come" so you can freely move there. Usually cutting the queue in two parts and the last ones can go ahead. (because the others will check soon).

So, this worker say "Please come, Cashier is open".
I was the 3rd. Two persons and their carts in front of me. Both of them saw the cashier opening but no one moves there. They were doubtful.

The second, probably thought, that the one in front of him has the right to go first. But he didn't wanted to move because he will check soon. So, I just get my stuff and went there and some people from my back follow me.
What happened?

As soon as I start checking my stuff, the woman that was in front also changed the queue but now is on my back.
So her blood was boiling and start saying loudly to the first one I was very unpolite. So, we all start quarreling. People on my back said I'm right, someothers said I'm wrong; but depends on the criteria.

Fortunately, this is just annecdotic.

But in China, they have the same problem almost with every deal, you can realize that ideas and behaviors of the old people, mid-age and young people are completely different. Being conservative, moderate and liberal in many different ways. So they don't waste time quarreling or trying to let others adopt a new rule.
Some people makes queue, some others don't. Some follow the traffic rules, some others don't. Somes wanna get married before 25....
That's the reality. There isn't a common criteria to follow; but it is easy to identify the ones that they're following ours.
28 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. Canada
"what if they were your elderly grandparents..." That would depend on my grandpa's mood, knowing my grandma she'd shame the person hahaha
As you've said, they seemed ok with it. Either they don't see it as an issue or maybe they don't see it as somethin to waste time and energy on? If you wanna be upset about though, go ahead, it's your time and energy. Just don't forget that one individual culture's standard isn't something to base the whole world on.
28 Mar 2011


Female
Fr. Netherlands
The Chinese people I speak to all agree that cutting in line is a very bad habit, and they really don't like it. At the same time, they feel, like the elderly couple, there's nothing they can do about it. I've said "paidui" (line up) quite a few times to severe line-cutters and the laowai face usually shames them off, but I have that "power" because they'll do it not to embarrass China in front of the foreigner, not because it's just courteous.

To those people who're saying "this is China, get used to it", you're right and wrong at the same time. It is something that happens quite often here, so it looks like it's part of the culture. And indeed, who's to say that one culture is better than the other? Impossible! But I think it's not right to qualify this as part of Chinese culture. While a good number of Chinese do it, an even larger amount does not and frowns upon those who do (albeit in silence). I think culture is what the majority does, and we can safely say the majority of Chinese (at least in Xiamen) waits in line. The cultural difference is not in the "waiting in line" aspect, but in the "I can point out mistakes in others" aspect. In the West we find this acceptable, but in China it isn't.

Either way you look at it (as cultural line-cutting or cultural not-speaking-up), you'll end up at the same spot: some people will cut the line and you can't help it. But somehow for me accepting it becomes easier when I see the cultural difference as not opening my big mouth every time. I can more easily accept that my culture is different about what I can say and what not, than accepting what I perceive as rudeness.
28 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. Australia
if only the world was perfect... we'd all be having a very different conversation right now.
28 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. South Georgia and the South Sandwich Isl
I've used 'pai dui' or 'ni bu xing cha dui' a few times. Works a charm. I've also used my bulk to bump jumpers out my way (once they've already cut in front of me).

It's happening less and less, and depending on my mood I say/do something or ignore it.

A memorable event was watching a line jumper get cussed and heckled to the back of the line at Xiada hospital, by all the elderly in the line he'd jumped. He told them to piss off and gave them dirty looks, but they just got more vocal, until he finally slunk to the back of the line, cussing under his breath.

Just like back home where we have well educated, polite folk, and then the less educated (and usually less well mannered) so it is here.

In my country jumping the queue can get your head smashed in. So we just don't do it in SA..
28 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. United States
Cultural norms can change over time. When I was in a KFC in Beijing in 1998, I woman would hand you a slip of paper with the order you just placed after walking in. Then it was all pushing and shoving at the counter with everyone waving their papers trying to get their order taken.

It was and still is the funniest thing I've ever seen in China. Glad it's not like THAT anymore though!
28 Mar 2011


Female
Fr. Philippines
If somebody cuts in line for no valid reasons, I usually tap their back and point my hand to the end of the line. That is if I have the guts and it depends whether the person looks beat-able or not. :)
But I think this is normal for them. Most Chinese also don't react if other persons cut in front of them.
28 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. Germany
I'm taller and bigger than most people, so normally just a bad look does the trick...
28 Mar 2011


Fr.
bro being Canadian, i feel the same way as you. **** drives me up the wall. ****ing cockroaches!! LEARN SOME COMMON COURTESY!!!

hahaha screw this attitude "Its the chinese way, so deal with it" They want to copy everything else from the west, first they should learn to copy MANNERS.

everydays a struggle lol.

(i hope you all dont take me too serious) but yaa.. i feel ya!

29 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. United Kingdom
This annoys me a lot. However, I now have a policy of not letting people push in and that helps a lot.

I'm 188 cm, have powerful elbows and can pull a very fierce face when I have to. If anyone does manage to get past my elbows, I cut in front of them and tell them that I was there first. To date, nobody has dared argue with me when confronted with pushing in.
30 Mar 2011


Male
Fr. South Georgia and the South Sandwich Isl
I think the majority of locals who have tried there luck pushing directly in front of a foreigner with a bit of 'grr' have learnt their lesson, and won't repeat.

Same when I'm on my bike or on a sidewalk - put the 'hard man' face if necessary, and generally space is given.

I love walking with my neighbour's Rottweiler on the boardwalk - people literally scatter. If only I could take her with me to the supermarkets too!
31 Mar 2011


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